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Recreational Therapy Archives

1953 JHPER: National Recreational Therapy Section News

JHPER: National Recreational Therapy Section News

[ archives page | Index | 1952 | 1953 | 1954 |1955 | 1956 | 1957 | 1958 | 1959 ]

(Editor: Bernath E. Phillips from "52-'58)

(year)volume:issue:page

(1953)24:1:46;2:46;3:46;4:46;5:46;6:46;7:46,52;8:46;9:46;10:46

Permissions

Originally published in the January 1953 JHPER, v24, issue 1, page 46...

District and State Sections

In the near future, most district and state Associations for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation will be holding their annual meetings. Those interested in the organization, at these local levels, of counterparts of the national Recreational Therapy Section, are advised to select at an early date representatives to petition the presidents of their local associations for appropriate action. The Recreational Therapy Section Operating Code, published in the June 1952 JOURNAL, anticipates the formation of such sections, and will serve as a guide in the development of other necessary operating codes. Leaders in the Recreational Therapy field are encouraged to take the initiative in the formation of District and State Recreational Therapy Sections, for these will constitute the basic structure upon which our national section will continue to grow.

Job Qualifications and Opportunities

Recently your editor has received several requests from college students for information relative to schools offering training in Recreational Therapy and to qualifications required and opportunities for employment in this general area. This column in the November JOURNAL pointed to the specialized graduate training being offered at Springfield College, University of Minnesota, and Columbia University. Information relative to selected graduate courses should be obtained from the many schools offering courses in Recreation, Physical Education, Group Work, Occupational Therapy, and the like.

Qualification requirements for employment opportunities in recreational therapy can be obtained from the following agencies which are known to employ recreation workers in hospitals: Recruitment and Placement Office of Personnel Veterans Administration Washington 25, D. C. State Personnel Board Office 1015 I. St. Sacramento 14, Calif. Minnesota Civil Service Dept. State Office Building, St. Paul 1, Minn. Personnel Service American National Red Cross 18th and D Streets, N. W. Washington 13, D. C. State Dept. of Civil Service Albany, New York Dept. of Public Welfare Rm. 1500, 160 N. LaSalle St. Chicago 1, Illinois For an excellent description of hospital recreation positions in the federal government and the general qualifications required therefor, the reader is referred to the United States Civil Service Commission Class Specifications, Recreation Series, GS 188-0, February 1951. These may be obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., at 20 cents per copy. The National Society for Crippled Children and Adults, Inc., Room 1015, 11 S. LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois, maintains a "National Personnel Registry and Employment Exchange." Personnel placement service information is also obtainable from: W. C. Sutherland Personnel Director National Recreation Association 315 4th Avenue New York 10, N. Y. Dr. J. Bertram Kessel Consultant in Recreation and Outdoor Education, AAHPER 1201 16th Street, N. W., Washington 6, D. C.

ARC Needs Hospital Recreationists

The American National Red Cross is recruiting women recreation workers for positions in hospitals of the Armed Forces of the United States wherever they may be located. Persons accepting employment positions become employees of the ARC with the understanding that they are available for service in any geographical area, including overseas. Preference is given the college graduate.

Originally published in the February 1953 JHPER, v24, issue 2, page 46....

Recreation in the Mental Hospital

Dr. Paul Haun's article entitled "Recreation in the Mental Hospital--A Philosophy," which appeared in the September, 1952 issue of this JOURNAL, has stimulated an unusual amount of interest. There have been several requests for reprints of the article. The December 1952 issue of Mental Hospitals quotes liberally from the article and it is reprinted in its entirety in the December 1952 issue of Child-Family Digest. The article is well worth re-reading.

Will Eastern District Be First?

In last month's column, your editor encouraged the formation of Recreational Therapy Sections at district and state levels of our association. He is happy to report that as early as December 16, 1952, he received word from Robert C. Boyd, Chief, Special Services at the VA Hospital, Aspinwell, Pa., that steps had already been taken to form such a section in the Eastern District. It is not too early to make necessary preliminary plans for the formation of these local sections at the several annual district spring meetings.

Applications for ARC Positions

Last month's column reported that the American Red Cross is recruiting women recreation workers for hospital positions. Those wishing to apply for these positions should direct their applications to the nearest Area Office, rather than to the Red Cross National Headquarters in Washington, D. C.

The four area office addresses are: Eastern Area Office, 615 North St. Asaph St., Alexandria., Va.; Midwestern Area Office, 1050 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis 8, Mo.; Southeastern Area Office, 230 Sprint St., N. W., Atlanta 3, Ga., and Pacific Area Office, 1550 Sutter St., San Francisco 1, Calif.

NAMT Meeting

The Third Annual Meeting of the National Association for Music Therapy was held Oct. 30, 31 - Nov. 1 at the Hotel Kansan in Topeka, Kan. Approximately 350 people were in attendance. There are at present more than 300 members of this relatively new professional association, which has as its purpose the progressive development of the user of music in medicine, and the advancement of research, interests, and standards of music therapy.

A significant development at this meeting was the adoption of requirements for undergraduate training leading to the bachelor's degree in Music Therapy.

Newly elected President is E. Thayer Gaston, Ph.D., University of Kansas, Lawrence. John M. Anderson, M.D., superintendent of Topeka State Hospital, and Karl Menninger, M.D., The Menninger Foundation, Topeka, Kan., were elected to the Board of Directors. The Kellogg Center, East Lansing, Mich., was selected as the location for the fourth annual meeting which is scheduled for mid-October 1953.

Miracle on Skis

Your editor has had the pleasure of reviewing an informative, inspiring, and entertaining motion picture "Miracle on Skis." Photographed in the Austrian Alps, it is a story depicting how two leg amputees, one unilateral and one bilateral, have overcome, through skiing, their physical handicaps received during World War II. The picture is 16mm, black and white, two reels' running time approximately 20 minutes. Booking information can be secured from Regal Pictures, 246 Stuart St., Boston 16, Mass.

Sports for the Blind

Those interested in this topic will want to read an article by Basil Curtis entitled "St. Dunstan's at Sport," which appeared in the November 1952 issue of New Era. St. Dunstan's is a nation-wide rehabilitation organization for the blind, with branches throughout the British Commonwealth. This article indicates that "it is not enough...to prepare a newly blinded man to earn his living. Equally important are the keeping up of social contacts and the constructive use of leisure Sport provides one of the best 'roads to both these goals." A detailed account is given of application of sports rehabilitation of the blind.

Originally published in the March 1953 JHPER, v24, issue 3, page 46....

Directories of Hospitals

On occasion your editor is asked for information on the employment of recreation personnel and the conduct of recreation activities in hospitals. Since most of this information must be secured directly from hospitals, reference should be made either to the Guide to Hospitals, published annually by the American Hospital Association, or to Hospitals Registered by the American Medical Association (Hospital Number), May 10, 1952, with supplement.

AETA

The American Educational Theater Association has a project, begun in 1949, through which AETA college and university chapters volunteer their assistance to VA hospital recreation supervisors in connection with dramatic activities for patients.

A Contact Placement Service recently established by AETA for its members maintains a file of qualified applicants for positions in the drama field. Requests for information about this service should be addressed to Mrs. June Madison Moll, Dept. of Drama, Univ. of Texas, Austin.

Developments in Minnesota

Fred M. Chapman, supervisor of Patients Program Services, Divn. of Public Institutions, 410 Globe Building, St. Paul 1, Minn., has instituted a monthly newsletter as a communication device for all Minnesota State Hospital personnel employed in the Patient Activities, Occupational Therapy, and Hospital Industrial Placement divisions. The January issue indicates that the Patient Activity Leader 1 and Patient Activity Leader II hospital positions are now open to nation-wide competition.

The National Recreation Association's mimeographed publication P 162-1-53, Student Aid For College Recreation Majors, announced that the State of Minnesota, Divn. of Public Institutions, has established Patient Activities Trainee and Patient Activity Intern positions as part of an internship plan for students desiring college field work in Minnesota State Hospitals. It is anticipated that the plan will be in operation for the academic year 1953-54 and open to students enrolled at any institution who can meet qualification standards.

Miscellany

Monthly distribution of the Recreation Suggestions Exchange Bulletin of the American National Red Cross is now being made to all VA hospitals and domiciliaries. Distribution began with the January 1953 issue. This bulletin presents ideas and operational plans of the Red Cross recreation program in military hospitals.

Recent References

Recent references which have come to your editor's attention are: Hill, Beatrice H., "Recreation Needs in a Civilian Hospital," Recreation, Jan. 1953. Contains a classification of patient needs, excerpted from the author's new book, Starting a Recreational Program in a Civilian Hospital, an NRA publication. McKee, Charles B., "Archery, A Hospital Therapy." Archery, Oct. 1952. Relates the experiences of the author in teaching archery, as a volunteer at a VA hospital in the South. Parker, Eloise C., "Play Therapy." The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Sept.-Oct. 1952. A report of a two-year study on the use of toys, conducted in the Pediatric Division of Lenox Hill Hospital,N. Y. Proceedings, 34th National Recreation Congress, 1952. "Hospital Recreation." N. Y.: NRA, 1952. pp. 116-121; Summarizes discussions on the following topics: (1) Basic considerations which affect the thinking and planning of hospital recreation workers, (2) What are the recreation interests and capacities of patients? (3) How are recreation activities being adapted to patients? and (4) Recreation in state hospitals. Roland, Mary C., "Psychotherapeutic Aspects of Play," The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Sept.-Oct. 1952. A discussion of the psychotherapeutic aspects of the play of children in a child guidance clinic.

Originally published in the April 1953 JHPER, v24, issue 4, page 46.

VA Patient Contests

In February the Veterans Administration announced the winners of the VA Popular Song Writing Contest, a contest for long-term patients in VA hospitals conducted last fall by a group of music publishers affiliated with Broadcast Music, Inc., in cooperation with VA's Special Services. Although this was the first contest of its kind, it attracted an estimated 300 patients from 60 hospitals. The more than 150 entries submitted were judged by 11 of the nation's leading personalities in the music and entertainment world.

The VA also announced the Seventh Annual National Writing Contest and the Seventh Annual VA Telegraphic Bowling Tournament for Ambulatory and Wheelchair Patients. Both of these contests have enjoyed greater response each year. In 1952, over 1,000 entries were received from more than 80 hospitals in the nation-wide writing contest sponsored by the Hospitalized Veterans Writing Project, a volunteer organization, in co-operation with VA's Special Services. The contest this year opened February 15 and will close April 15.

The bowling tournament got under way March 9 and extends through April 4. In last year's contest 578 patients participated on 54 teams representing 41 hospitals. Each year,the Bowlers Victory Legion provides trophies and has its local representatives assist in the conduct of the tournament at participating hospitals.

APMR Newsletter

In January 1953, the Association for Physical and Mental Rehabilitation re instituted its Newsletter after approximately a year's interim. This new edition has a completely new format and will be published bimonthly, alternating with the association's Journal, which is also a bimonthly publication. The dissemination of the Newsletter will be a free service to members of the association. The editor is Roger H. Wessel, Box 178, Montrose, N. Y.

The association has scheduled its seventh annual convention for the Hotel Mayflower, Washington, D. C., July 20-24, 1953.

Clinical Center Facilities

Dr. Robert A. Cohen, director of Clinical Research for the National Institute of Mental Health, reported that the new Clinical Center of the Public Health Service at Bethesda, Maryland, will have generous provisions for recreational therapy with a gymnasium, theater, outdoor recreational areas, private roof gardens, and private yards.

The recreation hall has a motion picture booth and stage and is designed primarily for group participation activities.

Adapted Sports Paper

Your editor presented a thirty-minute paper on "Adapted Sports in Veterans Administration Hospitals and Domiciliaries" at the Intramural Section Meeting of the 56th Annual Meeting of the College Physical Education Association in New York City, Dec. 29, 1952. This paper will be published this spring in the CPEA Proceedings, 56th Annual Meeting- 1953.

The 1953 Flying Wheels

This is the title of a brochure obtained by your editor at a wheelchair basketball game between the Long Beach, Calif., Paralyzed Veterans Association and the McGuire Hospital Chairoteers of Richmond, Va., played in February at the Walter Reed General Hospital in Washington, D. C. This brochure indicates that the "Flying Wheels," the California team, is out to prove to themselves and to others that handicapped individuals need not sit on the sidelines.

They travel by chartered DC-3 plane and are always accompanied by a physician, a registered nurse, and a staff of aides. On their first five coast-to-coast trips the Wheels won 35 and lost 15 intercity engagements.

This is the sixth annual tour of the Flying Wheels, most of whom are former patients at VA hospitals. These tours are non-profit and non commercial and are sponsored through donations and services.

Essentially the only feature of basketball which must be adapted for play in wheelchairs is to define the dribble to permit two pushes on the wheels, while the ball rests on the player's lap. No other major adaptations of rules or equipment are necessary.

Originally published in the May 1953 JHPER, v24, issue 5, page 46...

California Recreation Conference

Approximately 80 conferees attended one of the special sessions of the Fifth Annual California Recreation Conference, held Feb. 10 13, at Long Beach, Calif. The conference was devoted to a panel discussion on relationship of the hospital recreation program to the professional aims of the medical team.

Represented on the panel from military, state, and VA hospitals were two physicians, a clinical psychologist, a recreation director, a recreation training supervisor, a supervisor of rehabilitation therapies, and a social worker. The panel was chaired by Lourence O. Janssen, asst. area director for VA's Special Services area office in San Francisco; recorded by Kenneth A. Hill, special services officer, State Veterans Home and Hospital, Napa, Calif.; and summarized by Douglas Dashiell, asst. chief of Special Services, VA Center, Los Angeles.

Institute in Hospital Recreation

The Univ. of North Carolina will conduct a Southern Regional Institute in Hospital Recreation, May 21-23. The institute will be of particular interest to hospital recreation administrators, supervisors, and leaders, institutional recreation workers, volunteer hospital workers, and recreation teachers.

For additional details, write Dr. Harold D. Meyer, Box 1139, Chapel Hill, N. C.

Suggestions Invited, AGAIN

In September, your suggestions were invited on authors and topics for feature articles on Recreational Therapy in the JOURNAL; types of information you would like to see in this column; and news items and ideas for this column. Feature articles of a high caliber are especially desired for consideration of publication in the JOURNAL. Mail your suggestions to the Section Editor.

News Items

Ruth Flannery, recreation supervisor, Fitzsimmons Army Hospital, Denver, Colo., is the author of an informative and provocative article in the February 1953 issue of the American Red Cross Recreation Suggestions Exchange Bulletin entitled "What Are the Recreation Interests for Patients with Contagious and Infectious Diseases."

The cover of the March 1953 issue of Mental Hospitals depicts Pennington Hall, the new Recreational Therapy Center for the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B. C. This one-story building, built and equipped at a cost of approximately $300,000, is reported to have, among other facilities, a gymnasium-auditorium, four bowling alleys, a game room, coffee bar, and a projection room for 35mm motion pictures.

During March, the Central Office Recreation Service staff of the Veterans Administration conducted two three-day training seminars in hospital recreation. The first was held for the chiefs of recreation from eight VA tuberculosis hospitals; the second, for the chiefs of recreation from five VA Domiciliary Centers.

Bulletin on Adapted Sports

The paper on "Adapted Sports in VA Hospitals and Domiciliaries," presented by your editor at the 56th Annual Meeting of the College Physical Education Association in December is now published by the Veterans Administration Special Services Information Bulletin 1B 6-252, dated Feb. 13, 1953. While the limited supply lasts, single copies may be secured without charge by those employed in hospital recreation and by those in colleges and universities engaged in training or research in this field.

Request for these information bulletins should be directed to: Director, Recreation Service, Special Services, Veterans Administration, Washington 25, D. C.

Veterans' Voices

A new magazine devoted entirely to stories, articles, and poetry written by veteran patients in hospitals, titled Veterans' Voices, is being sponsored by the Kansas City Alumnae of Theta Sigma Phi, national sorority in journalism, in co-operation with the Hospitalized Veterans Writing Project, Inc., and with VA's Special Services. The magazine is to be published three times a year. Its circulation will be limited to patients in VA hospitals and homes, and to members of the HVWP, a volunteer group which has been furthering creative writing among ill and disabled veterans in VA hospitals for more than three years.

Originally published in the June 1953 JHPER, v24, issue 6, page 46...

Eastern District New RT Section

At the 35th annual conference of the EDA held in Pittsburgh, April 19-23, Robert C. Boyd, chief, Special Services, VA Hospital, Aspinwall, Pa., was elected chairman of a newly formed District Recreational Therapy Section.

Mr. Boyd earned this recognition for his work as Chairman of the President's Committee on Recreational Therapy in initiating and following through on the organization of the Section. George L. Sanford, director of Recreation, Newington Home and Hospital for Crippled Children, Newington, Conn., was elected Secretary, and Mrs. Frances B. Ewing, recreation director, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pa., Secretary-elect of the Section. A Chairman-elect will be selected at a later date.

At this conference, Dr. Raymond F. Smith, manager, VA Hospital, Aspinwall, chaired an excellent panel discussion on The Medical Profession and Recreational Therapy. Other members on the panel were: C. Howard Marcy, M.D., chief, NP Service, VA Hospital, Aspinwall; Murray Ferterber, M.D., asst. prof. of medicine, Univ. of Pittsburgh; and Catherine T. McClure, Ph.D., asst. prof. of pediatrics, Univ. of Pittsburgh.

Operational Techniques

B. J. Rudquist, chairman, AAHPER's Recreational Therapy Section, and chief, Special Services, VA Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Palo Alto, Calif., states: "We have published many articles which discuss the principles and the theories of recreational therapy. However, it now appears both timely and necessary to focus our attention and writings on the work of publishing operational techniques..."

Toward this end Mr. Rudquist has submitted some of his observations on the clinical application of recreational therapy in the mental hospital.

Clinical application of recreational therapy modalities is authorized by the psychiatrist. After he has discussed the overall treatment plan for the patient and its therapeutic aims, the conduct and integration of the recreational therapy regimen becomes the responsibility of the recreational therapist.

At this point the recreational therapist is placed on his own resources for it is here the selection of the social milieu and the specific type of activity, its modification, adaptation, or refinement becomes his primary concern. Full attention should be focused on a significant aspect of this social milieu, namely, its therapeutic atmosphere. The social milieu must be readily acceptable, understood, and reassuring to the patient.

Therefore, careful selection of the patients who are to be in the group is of utmost importance. The group should contain patients who are compatible and toward whom a definite attitude and approach has been prescribed by the psychiatrist. It is important that therapists and ward staff actually assume this attitude toward the patients within the group.

For example, it would be somewhat non reassuring, if not confusing, to a patient if one therapist were kind and firm to him while another were not; or, where the same therapist, while firm to him, were observed by this patient to be jovial and reassuring to another patient.

To understand the value and effect of play experience upon patients as individuals, the recreational therapist must learn to observe small though not insignificant changes in a patient's attitude. Any change of attitude in a play situation, regardless of whether it evidences pleasure or irritation, has significance for it supplies valuable information about the patient which, in turn, assists the therapist in better understanding the patient's emotional difficulties. When observations of these attitude changes are recorded on the patient's record card, a general profile of the patient's reactions, interests, dislikes, and progress begins to take form and his behavior can better be interpreted and understood.

RT Mailing List

Association members engaged, or especially interested, in recreational therapy should write: Dr. J. Bertram Kessel, Consultant in Recreation and Outdoor Education, AA11-PER, 1201 16th St., N.W., Wash. 6, D. C.; indicating that they would like to be placed on the mailing list for recreational therapy materials.

New members can accomplish this by indicating an interest on their membership applications.

Originally published in the September 1953 JHPER, v24, issue 7, pages 46 & 52...

District Sections

In our June 1953 column the organization of the Eastern District Recreational Therapy Section was reported. Robert C. Boyd, who initiated and followed through on this development, has given a detailed account of his successful experience. Your editor suggests that those who would initiate similar projects in other districts get under way now in order to have the necessary machinery operative by the spring division meetings. Your editor, Dr. Kessel, AAHPER consultant in recreation and outdoor education; or Mr. Boyd, VA Hospital, Aspinwall 15, Pa., will be happy to assist such efforts.

The Spice of Life

In an editorial of the above caption in the May issue of Recreation, Dr. George S. Stevenson, member of the board of directors of the National Association for Mental Health, Inc., states "It is something of a travesty on recreation to call it 'recreational therapy' and thereby try to crown it as a justification which obscures its inherent positive virtues."

Three paragraphs later Dr. Stevenson states "As with food, recreation is good for everyone, sick or well, but it may be therapeutic when a deficiency is found that calls for its specific use." John Eisele Davis well-presents some additional thoughts on this controversial topic in his lead article of the same issue entitled "Recreation Is More Than Fun."

Hospital Recreation Curriculums

Harvey E. Williams, formerly adviser in rehabilitation at Springfield College, has transferred to San Francisco State College, where he will be responsible for developing a professional curriculum in Hospital Recreation.

At Springfield College, Mr. Williams directed the graduate courses in Physical Education and Recreation in Rehabilitation, initiated a few years ago by Dr. Josephine Rathbone of Columbia University.

Edith L. Ball, instructor in education, New York University, also reports a new graduate curriculum in Hospital Recreation. The program includes courses in the philosophy and techniques of recreation; in the physical, emotional, and social problems of atypical people; as well as opportunities for field work or clinical experience.

For further information write Miss Ball, School of Education, New York University, Washington Square, New York 3, N. Y.

NART

A National Association of Recreational Therapists was organized at a meeting held at the Western State Hospital, Bolivar, Tenn., last February. Floyd E. McDowell, Western State Hospital, was elected President.

The basic purpose of the new association is to strive continually for better recreational therapy programs in mental hospitals, with special attention being directed to the needs of state institutions.

Those interested in becoming affiliated with NART should write Charles Cottle, executive secretary, at the Mississippi State Hospital, Whitfield, Miss. The official publication of NART is the Inter-State News.

Coming Meetings

Meetings of the Hospital Recreation Section of the American Recreation Society and the hospital meetings sponsored by the National Recreation Association will be held in conjunction with the 36th National Recreation Congress, Sept. 26-28 at the Hotel Bellevue Stanford, Philadelphia, Pa.

The fourth Annual Meeting of the National Association for Music Therapy will be held at the Kellogg Foundation, East Lansing, Mich., Oct. 19-21. Included in the program will be discussions concerning music for psychiatric and tuberculous patients, research in music therapy, music for geriatrics, and music for deviate children.

The 36th Annual Conference of the American Occupational Therapy Association will be held Nov. 13-20 at the Shamrock Hotel, Houston, Tex.

Professional Meeting Highlights

Dr. Edward Greenwood of Menninger Foundation was the main speaker at the Institutional Assembly on Rehabilitation held at the St. Cloud Reformatory in April. He spoke of recreation as therapy, pointing out that when it is employed as such, recreation is a means to an end and not an end in itself.

Alfred W. Deibel, assistant superintendent of Hastings State Hospital presented a paper on the "relationship of hospital recreation to medical departments" at the University of Minnesota Annual Spring Recreation Institute in May. The paper is summarized in the July August issue of the Minnesota Department of Public Welfare's Patients Program Services.

More than 100 hospital recreation leaders from 21 states attended the Southern Regional Institute in Hospital Recreation at Chapel Hill, N. C., in May. Many excellent papers were presented and plans are being made for publication of the proceedings.

Over 80 representatives of Southern Illinois University, Anna State Hospital, Tuberculosis Sanitarium, Menard Prison, and Illinois Security Hospital, all institutions in the southern Illinois region, attended an Orientation Conference on Activity Therapy which was held at the University in Carbondale in June.

Among other recommendations made at the meeting was one to the effect that curriculums offered to major students in physical education, art, industrial education, health education, and music should be supplemented and adapted so as to qualify students for opportunities in the institutional field.

More than 400 registrants, most of whom are corrective therapists in VA hospitals, attended the Seventh Annual Conference of the Association for Physical and Mental Rehabilitation held at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D. C., in July. The professional papers and scientific exhibit were of especially high caliber.

Originally published in the October 1953 JHPER, v24, issue 8, page 46...

Minnesota Is Recruiting

Fred M. Chapman, supervisor of patient program services, Department of Public Welfare, Minneapolis, writes:

"We now have 80 full-time hospital recreational personnel employed in our 11 state hospitals. However, our Civil Service eligibility lists are still somewhat bare, and we are especially interested in learning of new, qualified prospects who would be interested in joining our system." Patient Activities Leader I and II positions have a salary range of $252 to $332 per month; Patient Programs Supervisor I positions, $360 to $410. In addition, most Minnesota state hospital employees may receive their room, board, and laundry for $35.00 per month if they reside on institutional grounds. Employment may be secured only after successful completion of a Civil Service Examination, the written part of which may be taken in most large cities throughout the nation. In all cases, it is desirable to communicate directly with Mr. Chapman for purposes of exchanging detailed information pertaining to job preferences and opportunities.

Intercom

The American National Red Cross Recreation Suggestions Exchange Bulletin has had a face lifting. The June-July 1953 issue, Vol. VIII, Nos. 6 and 7, has come out with a new title, Intercom, and an attractive masthead and format. This well-respected publication is a monthly, and although distributed primarily to military hospitals, it is made available upon request to Veterans Administration and state hospitals. Lillian Summers, National Recreation Consultant, Service in Military Hospitals ANRC, Washington 13, D. C., is Editor.

Clubmobiles in Korea

The American National Red Cross needs personnel for clubmobile recreation programs in the Far East. Qualified young women should apply at once. See page 52 for details and information about where to write.

Sport and Health

Sport and Health, 50 lectures from the International Conference on Sport and Health held in Oslo in connection with the Olympic Winter Games 1952, is a fine publication. It is understood that while the supply lasts the book may be obtained free of charge. Requests should be directed to Otto Johansen, M.D., Statens Ungdomsog Idrettskontor, Kronprinsens gt. 6, Oslo, Norway.

Music Performance Trust Fund

If you have not had the benefit of instrumental concerts made available by your AFM local through the co-operation of the Music Performance Trust Fund, your attention is invited to an article "Music Comes to Disabled Veterans" by Lenard Quinto, chief of music, Recreation Service, Special Services, VA, Washington, D. C., in the May International Musician. In the article Mr. Quinto describes the recreational and therapeutic programs made available through the MPTF. According to law, similar programs may be set up for public hospitals provided that monies allocated to the geographical areas are sufficient for music performances desired.

For further information, write Samuel R. Rosenbaum, Trustee, Music Performance Trust Fund, 11 E. 47th St., New York 17, N. Y.

Originally published in the November 1953 JHPER, v24, issue 9, page 46...

Hospital Recreation Concepts

Under the chairmanship of C. C. Bream, Jr., the Committee on Basic Concepts of Hospital Recreation of the Hospital Recreation Section, American Recreation Society, has published a 26-page report of the committee's study of prevailing concepts of recreation for the ill and disabled.

This report contains the Statement of Tenet of the Hospital Recreation Section and appears to be essential reading for all who are sincerely interested in the care of the ill and disabled. The report, published September 27, is entitled Basic Concepts of Hospital Recreation.

Treatment Through Activity

The Biennial Report for 1950-52 of the State of California Department of Mental Hygiene indicates that the 1950-51 budget provided for a supervisor of rehabilitation therapies at each of the state mental hospitals. The therapies are occupational, educational, religious, music, recreational, and industrial. The report estimates that "...15 percent of the patients are reached by specifically prescribed rehabilitation therapies...activities, such as dances, parties, shows, holiday celebrations and other social and recreational programs...reach about 95 percent of all patients.

"Music therapy is one of the newest methods of treatment added to those used in California mental hospitals and much is still to be leaned about how it works and how to use it most effectively.

"Recreational therapy covers such a broad field that almost every type of activity is included. But for the most part, recreational therapy includes physical activities, such as walks, hikes, simple games, sports, and social activities."

VA Reorganizes

Reorganization of the Veterans Administration Central Office Staff has resulted in the placing of the Recreation Division in the Department of Medicine and Surgery. The Division, experiencing a reduction in the number of professional employees, will now be responsible, primarily, for the planning and evaluation of hospital recreation in the VA's more than 160 hospitals and domiciliaries, operating functions having been transferred to another office. W. Hal Orion, who still heads the VA's hospital recreation program, will be assisted by C. C. Bream, Jr., E. J. Kelly, Lenard Quinto, and B. E. Phillips. Neither VA field station recreation staffs nor programs have been reduced by the reorganization.

Patient Activities

The Fourteenth Biennial Report of the Minnesota State Division of Public Institutions contains more than 15 detailed references to the employment of recreation activities in the treatment of patients at state hospitals. Selected quotations from this report are:

"At the outset it must be recognized that recreation is not merely a device to please the patient and give him activity' it is an essential item in the treatment and rehabilitation of the mental patient.

"...included in the ten mental hospital programs are: arts and crafts, dancing, dramatics, entertainment, literary events, music, nature outings, social events, and sports and games.

"The program has been largely guided by 89 trained and experienced personnel. In-service training has been stressed...

"The primary aim...is not exclusively on the numbers of patients that are activated through these measures, but on the numbers of patients that progress to more complex activities and responsibilities. These persons will then be able to accept additional hospital work...and be better prepared for hospital adjustment or community living."

Recreation in Rehabilitation

W. Hal Orion, director of VA's hospital recreation program and Vice-President-elect for Recreation of AAHPER, taught the new course, "Recreation in Rehabilitation" at the recent summer session, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

AART Conference

More than 400 registrants attended the 4th Annual Scientific and Clinical Conference of the American Association of Rehabilitation Therapists held September 8-11 at the Edgewater Beach Hotel in Chicago. The conference theme was "Professional Growth of the Rehabilitation TEAM."

The program contained several panel discussions of interest to hospital recreation leaders, including such topics as "Definitive Treatment Objectives in Music Therapy," "The Contribution of Recreation to the Rehabilitation Therapy Team," and Co-ordination of Music Therapy with other Adjunctive Therapies."

Clarence P. Heft, chief, Educational Therapy, VA Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, and William L. Green, chief, Manual Arts Therapy, VA Hospital, Roanoke, Va., were elected President and President-elect, respectively, of the Association. The annual meeting will be held next year in Washington, D. C.

Originally published in the December 1953 JHPER, v24, issue 10, page 46...

National Recreation Congress

Several meetings of direct interest and benefit to those in our field were conducted at the 35th National Recreation Congress, in Philadelphia September 28-October 2. C. C. Bream, Jr., reported on the study just completed by a subcommittee of the American Recreation Society, entitled Basic Concepts of Hospital Recreation. Annabelle Story chaired a discussion on In-Service Training for Recreation Personnel in Hospitals. Paul Haun, M.D., and George G. Deaver, M.D., spoke on Recreation in the Total Hospital Situation and The Role of Recreation in Rehabilitation, respectively. Martin W. Meyer, chairman elect of our section, summarized the meeting on Recreation in the General Medical and Surgical Hospital.

In a meeting entitled Demonstration of Recreation in a Chronic Hospital, arranged by Mrs. Beatrice Hill, seven patients from the Goldwater Memorial Hospital in New York City related how recreation contributed to their rehabilitation.

At the annual meeting of the ARS, 1953-54 officers of the Hospital Recreation Section were announced as follows: Chairman--Dorothy Taaffe, recreation supervisor, American Red Cross, U. S. Naval Hospital, St. Albans, Long Island, N. Y.; Vice-Chairman--Fred Chapman, assistant professor of recreation training, University of Minnesota; Secretary--Annabelle Story, recreation training supervisor, Pacific Area, American Red Cross.

The Education of Specialists

In August, the Standards and Training Committee (Fred Chapman, chairman) of the Hospital Recreation Section, American Recreation Society, released a report of a study entitled The Education of Specialists in Hospital Recreation. This study, conducted last spring, indicated that of the 44 colleges and universities included in the study which offer degrees in recreation, six offer graduate or undergraduate degrees in hospital recreation, as follows: Columbia University--Master's degree, Recreation in Rehabilitation; University of Minnesota--Master of Education, Hospital Recreation; New York University--Master of Arts, Hospital Recreation; Springfield College -Master's degree, Physical Education and Recreation in Rehabilitation; Purdue University--Bachelor of Physical Education, Remedial Physical Education; Sacramento State College- -Bachelor of Arts, Recreational Therapy.

Three additional institutions of higher learning plan to offer degrees in this area in the near future.

Nine provide opportunities for recreation students to take courses in medicine, psychiatry, or related medical areas. Eighteen arrange for students to have field work or internship experience in Hospitals. Forty-one students enrolled in the institutions surveyed, were engaged in hospital recreation research projects.

The study concludes by asking, among other questions, "Should more standardized and uniform medical 'approval' be granted and exerted over the increased number of schools that are offering specialized degrees in this area?" and "Is a system of registration or certification feasible for those experienced specialists now in the field and those who have recently graduated from hospital recreation curriculums?"

Recreational Therapy, 1819

"...of all the modes by which patients may be induced to restrain themselves, regular employment is perhaps the most generally efficacious; and those kinds of employment are doubtless to be preferred which are accompanied by considerable bodily action, that are most agreeable to the patient, and which are most opposite to the illusions of his disease.

"...every effort should be made to divert the mind of melancholiacs by bodily exercise, walks, conversations, reading, and other recreations. Those who manage the insane should sedulously endeavor to gain their confidence and esteem, to arrest their attention and fix it on objects opposed to their delusions...and to remember that in the wreck of the intellect the affections not infrequently survive."

These quotations are from A Description of the York Retreat--1819, taken from the Biennial Report for 1950-52 of the State of California Department of Mental Hygiene. quotes liberally from the article and it is reprinted in its entirety in the December 1952 issue of Child-Family Digest. The article is well worth re-reading.

Will Eastern District Be First?

In last month's column, your editor encouraged the formation of Recreational Therapy Sections at district and state levels of our association. He is happy to report that as early as December 16, 1952, he received word from Robert C. Boyd, Chief, Special Services at the VA Hospital, Aspinwell, Pa., that steps had already been taken to form such a section in the Eastern District. It is not too early to make necessary preliminary plans for the formation of these local sections at the several annual district spring meetings.

Applications for ARC Positions Last month's column reported that the American Red Cross is recruiting women recreation workers for hospital positions. Those wishing to apply for these positions should direct their applications to the nearest Area Office, rather than to the Red Cross National Headquarters in Washington, D. C.

The four area office addresses are: Eastern Area Office, 615 North St. Asaph St., Alexandria., Va.; Midwestern Area Office, 1050 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis 8, Mo.; Southeastern Area Office, 230 Sprint St., N. W., Atlanta 3, Ga., and Pacific Area Office, 1550 Sutter St., San Francisco 1, Calif.

NAMT Meeting

The Third Annual Meeting of the National Association for Music Therapy was held Oct. 30, 31 - Nov. 1 at the Hotel Kansan in Topeka, Kan. Approximately 350 people were in attendance. There are at present more than 300 members of this relatively new professional association, which has as its purpose the progressive development of the user of music in medicine, and the advancement of research, interests, and standards of music therapy.

A significant development at this meeting was the adoption of requirements for undergraduate training leading to the bachelor's degree in Music Therapy.

Newly elected President is E. Thayer Gaston, Ph.D., University of Kansas, Lawrence. John M. Anderson, M.D., superintendent of Topeka State Hospital, and Karl Menninger, M.D., The Menninger Foundation, Topeka, Kan., were elected to the Board of Directors. The Kellogg Center, East Lansing, Mich., was selected as the location for the fourth annual meeting which is scheduled for mid-October 1953.

Miracle on Skis

Your editor has had the pleasure of reviewing an informative, inspiring, and entertaining motion picture "Miracle on Skis." Photographed in the Austrian Alps, it is a story depicting how two leg amputees, one unilateral and one bilateral, have overcome, through skiing, their physical handicaps received during World War II. The picture is 16mm, black and white, two reels' running time approximately 20 minutes. Booking information can be secured from Regal Pictures, 246 Stuart St., Boston 16, Mass.

Sports for the Blind

Those interested in this topic will want to read an article by Basil Curtis entitled "St. Dunstan's at Sport," which appeared in the November 1952 issue of New Era. St. Dunstan's is a nation-wide rehabilitation organization for the blind, with branches throughout the British Commonwealth. This article indicates that "it is not enough...to prepare a newly blinded man to earn his living. Equally important are the keeping up of social contacts and the constructive use of leisure Sport provides one of the best 'roads to both these goals." A detailed account is given of application of sports rehabilitation of the blind.

 

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